Top Shelf in November: A Feast of Cookbooks!

What a great list of food books!

November Top Shelf

It’s that time of year when our attention turns to holiday feasts and cozy nights cooking up special dishes to gather around. As the temperature dips, the leaves crisp, and the sweaters come out of the closet, hovering over a stove top and preheating the oven become welcome, heartening rituals. In this spirit, this month we’re highlighting five new cookbooks to inspire, ease and invigorate your epicurean adventures. Bon appetit! (Or, as we’re more apt to say around here, dig in, y’all.)

A Visual Guide to Drink: An Infographic Exploration of Beer, Wine, & Spirits
by Ben Gibson, Patrick Mulligan (On shelves November 17; available to pre-order now.)

Pull this book off your shelf to create thoughtful cocktails and keep your guests entertained while you shake and stir.  Designer Ben Gibson and editor Patrick Mulligan founded the design studio Pop Lab with the single goal of rendering all human experience in…

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Cookbook Review: Laura Theodore’s Vegan-Ease and a Cookie Recipe!

Great review!

It's Got Vegan In It

Vegan-Ease by Laura Theodore

I’m so thrilled and honored that I was asked to review Laura Theodore’s latest cookbook, “Vegan-Ease: An Easy Guide to Enjoying a Plant-Based Diet.” I’ve been a fan of Laura Theodore, a.k.a. The Jazzy Vegetarian, for a long time! I’ve listened to her radio show and watched her cooking show and checked out her other cookbooks — you name it. As someone that has been involved in some capacity with the arts since childhood, I’ve always appreciated she incorporates her own passion for jazz music into her calling to share delicious, healthy vegan food with the masses.

After going through this cookbook page by page, I literally got out pen and paper and made a list of all the great features of Vegan-Ease so that I didn’t forget to talk about all the things I like about it (and you will, too!).

First off, I love the clever title, teehee…

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Kathleen Flinn – The Kitchen Counter Cooking School

Great review! Fabulous book!

Fyrefly's Book Blog

97. The Kitchen Counter Cooking School: How a Few Simple Lessons Transformed Nine Culinary Novices into Fearless Home Cooks by Kathleen Flinn (2011)

Length: 285 pages
Genre: Non-fiction

Started: 20 December 2014
Finished: 21 December 2014

Where did it come from? Bought from Amazon.
Why do I have it? One of my fellow book club members recommended it to me after hearing that I like books about food and cooking.
How long has it been on my TBR pile? Since 22 November 2014.

Does your kitchen scare
you? Get this book then get your
butt in there and cook!

Summary: Kathleen Flinn had graduated from one of the most prestigious culinary schools in the world, but she still wasn’t sure what she wanted to do with herself, until the afternoon that she started spying on other people’s shopping carts, and found a woman who was filling her cart with boxed…

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The Encyclopedia of Herbs, Spices, & Flavorings by Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz – review

The Library Journal

This impressive new reference is far more encompassing than its title may at first indicate, for in addition to herbs and spices, it covers not only extracts and essences but also such flavorings as oils and vinegars, garlic, sauces and condiments, edible flowers, and more.

The excellent full-color photographs of ingredients, particularly of less familiar ones used in ethnic cuisines, are invaluable, but there are also very useful step-by-step photos of various kitchen techniques. Ortiz is the author of highly regarded cookbooks on the cooking of the Caribbean, Spain and Portugal, and Latin America, among others, and here she includes almost 200 recipes from cuisines around the world.

Beautifully illustrated and packed with information not readily available elsewhere, this is an essential purchase.

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A History Of Food In 100 Recipes – A book review

What a fabulous review!

thehistorygirlsyork

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So far I have aimed to share some of my historic discoveries and demonstrate how easily they fit into a modern cooking repertoire. Many people have enquired as to how I got started in food history and where they can go to do similiar research. As a beginner my first steps were in the world of medieval cookery, a truly exciting time of change. With the introduction of sugar and exotic spices into the stomachs of the most affluent in British society, diet often reflected many of the political and social changes of th era. There is a wealth of written information on this period, perfect for the historically curious cook.

As my understanding grew I so did my desire to learn more about how our diets evolved throughout history, rather than focusing on a single snapshot in time. So imagine my delight when my husband arrived home with the…

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